A City Rooted in Trees (WIP)

Alamogordo is a Spanish word that means "cottonwood grove." This name reflects the importance of trees to the city's history and culture. However, in recent years, the city's tree canopy has declined. This is due to several factors, including development, pests, and disease.

The Keep Alamogordo Beautiful Tree Project, "A City Rooted in Trees," is an initiative to teach the citizens of Alamogordo about the importance of trees and to help restore the city's tree canopy.

Adopt-A-Tree Program

The Adopt-A-Tree program allows individuals and businesses to adopt a tree in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The program is sponsored by Keep Alamogordo Beautiful, a community organization that works to improve the quality of life in the city.

Adopting a tree makes you responsible for its care and maintenance. This includes watering the tree during dry periods, trimming the branches, and removing dead or diseased limbs. You will also be given a plaque or other signage to mark the tree as yours.

Adopting a tree is a great way to get involved in your community and help to make Alamogordo a more beautiful place. It is also a way to learn about trees' importance and role in the environment.

How to adopt a tree:


*All trees must be native to the area.**Plantings will be scheduled from November - March

The Trees of Alamogordo

The city of Alamogordo is home to a wide variety of trees, from native desert species to imported beauties. The city's diverse climate and geography allow for a wide range of tree species to thrive, and the city's trees provide shade, beauty, and a sense of place.

This section is a comprehensive guide to the trees that can be found in the city.

Cottonwood Tree (Rio Grande Cottonwood)

The Rio Grande cottonwood (Populus deltoides wislizenii) is a large, deciduous tree that is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It is a subspecies of the eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and is similar in appearance but slightly smaller. Rio Grande cottonwoods typically grow to heights of 50-70 feet, with a trunk diameter of 2-5 feet. They have a broad, flattened crown of large, widely spreading branches. The bark is grayish-brown, and is often furrowed or cracked. The leaves are triangular in shape, 2-2.5 inches long and 2.5-3 inches wide. They are dark green on the upper surface, and paler on the underside. In the fall, the leaves turn yellow or orange.

Rio Grande cottonwoods are fast-growing trees, and can reach maturity in as little as 20 years. They are tolerant of a wide range of soils, but prefer moist, well-drained soils. They are also tolerant of wind and salt, making them well-suited for growing in desert regions.

Rio Grande cottonwoods are important trees in the southwestern United States. They provide shade and beauty, and they also help to stabilize the soil and prevent erosion. In addition, the cottonwood trees are a valuable source of food and shelter for wildlife.

Here are some interesting facts about the Rio Grande cottonwood tree:

Afghan Pine (Pinus eldarica)

The Afghan pine (Pinus eldarica), also known as the Eldarica pine, Mondel pine, Elder or Calabrian pine, is a medium-sized evergreen tree that is native to Afghanistan, Iran, and Turkey. It is a member of the pine family, and is closely related to the Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis). Afghan pines typically grow to heights of 40-60 feet, with a spread of 20-30 feet. They have a conical crown and smooth, reddish-brown bark that becomes flaky with age. The needles are in bundles of two, 3-5 inches long, and medium green. The cones are small, 1-3 inches long, and brown.

Here are some interesting facts about the Afghan pine tree:

Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica)

The Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica) is a medium-sized evergreen tree that is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It is the only cypress native to the region. Arizona cypresses typically grow to heights of 50-60 feet, with a trunk diameter of 15-30 inches. They have a dense, upright, conical crown and smooth reddish-brown bark that sometimes becomes fibrous with flat ridges. The leaves are scale-like, 2-5 mm long, and produced on rounded (not flattened) shoots. The seed cones are globose to oblong, 15-33 mm long, with 6 or 8 (rarely 4 or 10) scales, green at first, maturing gray or gray-brown about 20-24 months after pollination.

Here are some interesting facts about the Arizona cypress tree:

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a fast-growing, deciduous tree that is native to North America. It is a member of the pea family, and is closely related to the wisteria. Black locust trees typically grow to heights of 50-70 feet, with a spread of 30-40 feet. They have a straight trunk and a spreading, rounded crown. The bark is grayish-brown and deeply furrowed. The leaves are pinnately compound, with 7-19 leaflets. The leaflets are oval to oblong, 1-2 inches long, and dark green. The flowers are white, pea-like, and fragrant. They are arranged in drooping clusters. The fruit is a legume, which is a pod that contains several seeds. 

Here are some interesting facts about the black locust tree:

Cedar Elm (Ulmus crassifolia)

The cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), also known as the Texas cedar elm, is a deciduous tree native to south-central North America, mainly in southern and eastern Texas, southern Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana, with small populations in western Mississippi, southwest Tennessee, and north-central Florida; it also occurs in northeastern Mexico. It is the most common elm tree in Texas. The tree typically grows well in flat valley bottom areas referred to as cedar elm flats.

Cedar elm trees typically grow to heights of 50-75 feet, with a spread of 40-60 feet. They have a straight trunk and a rounded crown. The bark is grayish-brown and deeply furrowed. The leaves are small, 1-2.5 inches long and 0.75-1 inch wide, oval to elliptical in shape, finely-toothed or sometimes double-toothed along the margin, and blunt at the tip. The flowers are small, greenish-yellow, and appear in late summer or autumn. The fruit is a samara, which is a winged seed.

Here are some interesting facts about the cedar elm tree:

Honey Locust Tree (Gleditsia triacanthos)

The honey locust tree (Gleditsia triacanthos) is a fast-growing, deciduous tree that is native to North America. It is a member of the legume family, and is closely related to the carob tree. Honey locust trees typically grow to heights of 60-80 feet, with a spread of 30-40 feet. They have a straight trunk and a spreading, rounded crown. The bark is grayish-brown and deeply furrowed. The leaves are pinnately compound, with 7-19 leaflets. The leaflets are oval to oblong, 1-2 inches long, and dark green. The flowers are white, pea-like, and fragrant. They are arranged in drooping clusters. The fruit is a legume, which is a pod that contains several seeds.

Here are some interesting facts about the honey locust tree:

Honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)

Honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) is a small to medium-sized deciduous tree that is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It is a member of the legume family, and is closely related to the carob tree. Honey mesquite trees typically grow to heights of 20-30 feet, with a spread of 20-35 feet. They have a spreading, rounded crown and drooping branches. The bark is grayish-brown and deeply furrowed. The leaves are twice-compound, with 11-21 leaflets per leaf. The leaflets are small, 1-2 inches long and 1/4-1/2 inch wide, and are a bright green color. 

Here are some interesting facts about the honey mesquite tree:

Mexican Fan Palm Tree (Washingtonia robusta)

The Mexican fan palm tree (Washingtonia robusta) is a fast-growing, single-stemmed palm tree that is native to the Baja California peninsula and a small part of Sonora in northwestern Mexico. It is one of the most widely cultivated subtropical palms in the world. It is naturalized in Florida, California, Hawaii, Texas, parts of the Canary Islands, France, Italy, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Spain, Réunion, and Morocco.

Mexican fan palm trees typically grow to heights of 60-100 feet, with a trunk diameter of up to 3 feet. They have a crown of fan-shaped fronds that can grow 3-5 feet long. The fronds are bright green and have a feathery appearance. The flowers are small and cream-colored, and they are arranged in panicles. The fruit is a small, black drupe.

Here are some interesting facts about the Mexican fan palm tree:

Mexican pinyon pine (Pinus cembroides)

The Mexican pinyon pine (Pinus cembroides) is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree that is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It is a member of the pine family, and is closely related to the two-needle pinyon pine (Pinus edulis). Mexican pinyon pines typically grow to heights of 20-30 feet, with a spread of 15-20 feet. They have a compact, rounded crown and short, thick trunk. The bark is reddish-brown and deeply furrowed. The needles are in bundles of three, 1-1.5 inches long and dark green. The cones are small, 1-2 inches long, and brown.

Here are some interesting facts about the Mexican pinyon pine tree:

Mulberry Tree (Morus)

Mulberry trees are deciduous trees that are native to Asia, Europe, and North America. They are members of the Moraceae family, which also includes figs, jackfruit, and breadfruit. Mulberry trees typically grow to heights of 30-60 feet, with a spread of 20-40 feet. They have a spreading, rounded crown and a thick, deeply furrowed bark. The leaves are alternate, simple, and oval to heart-shaped. They are 2-4 inches long and 1-2 inches wide, and they have a serrated margin.

Here are some interesting facts about the mulberry tree:

Pecan Tree (Carya illinoinensis)

The pecan tree (Carya illinoinensis) is a large deciduous tree that is native to the southeastern United States. It is a member of the hickory family, and is closely related to the walnut tree. Pecan trees typically grow to heights of 70-100 feet, with a spread of 40-75 feet. They have a spreading, rounded crown and a thick, deeply furrowed bark. The leaves are alternate, pinnately compound, with 9-17 leaflets. The leaflets are oval to oblong, 1-2 inches long, and dark green. The flowers are small, greenish-yellow, and appear in late spring. The fruit is a drupe, which is a hard-shelled nut that is enclosed in a husk.

Here are some interesting facts about the pecan tree:

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